FAQ

What is MROC?
What are neighbouring rights?
What is MROC’s connection to Re:Sound?
What is the Private Copying levy?
Is MROC the same as SOCAN? Or CMRRA? Or Connect Music Licensing? Or …?
How do I sign up?
Is there a registration fee?
Does MROC collect for the performance of my sound recordings in other countries?
How do I get paid?
What are the eligibility criteria for neighbouring rights payments?
Who’s eligible for private copying royalties?
When do I get paid?
How much money can I expect?
How do I inform you of new recordings?


What is MROC?

The Musicians’ Rights Organization Canada (MROC) is a Canadian federally incorporated not-for-profit organization whose primary objective is to collect and distribute royalties to musicians and vocalists. MROC distributes the performer’s share of neighbouring rights and private copying royalties. These royalties primarily flow from the broadcast and public performance of sound recordings and are based on tariffs approved by the Copyright Board of Canada. MROC represents more than 6000 musicians, from session players to featured artists, recording across the full range of genres.


What are neighbouring rights?

The term ”neighbouring rights” refers to the rights of performers (musicians and vocalists) and sound recording “makers” (labels) to receive payment for the broadcast or public performance of their recordings. This is also referred to as the “right of equitable remuneration” in Canada’s Copyright Act. If you have performed on a sound recording, you may be eligible to receive royalties.


What is MROC’s connection to Re:Sound?

Re:Sound [formerly the Neighbouring Rights Collective of Canada (NRCC)] is a not-for-profit collective created in 1997. Re:Sound collects fees from music users for their broadcasting and public performance of sound recordings. Performer royalties collected by Re:Sound are paid to musicians and vocalists via MROC or one of the two other performer collectives in Canada. (Similarly, record company royalties are paid by Re:Sound to sound recording makers via one of two maker collectives in Canada.) Additional information about Re:Sound can be found on its website: www.resound.ca


What is the Private Copying levy?

In Canada, manufacturers and importers of blank audio recording media are required to collect a levy on the media they sell in order to compensate performers, sound recording makers, songwriters and publishers for the copying of their works by private individuals. This type of copying would otherwise provide no compensation to the copyright owners. The levy is collected by the Canadian Private Copying Collective (www.cpcc.ca) and distributed to MROC among other collectives, via Re:Sound, for further distribution to the performers it represents.


Is MROC the same as SOCAN? Or CMRRA? Or Connect Music Licensing? Or …?

No. MROC and these other organizations collect and pay different types of royalties. MROC pays musicians and vocalists for the performance of their recorded performances.

Connect Music Licensing and SOPROQ pay record labels for the performance of their sound recordings. They also pay the labels for the reproduction of their sound recordings and their music videos.

SOCAN pays composers, songwriters and music publishers for the performance of their musical works. CMRRA and SODRAC pay them for the reproduction of their musical works.

If you have multiple roles on a recording, e.g. you are the musician, songwriter, own the rights to the publishing, and/or own the master, you can collect royalties for all those different types of rights and should sign up with an organization to represent you for each of those rights. See the Resource section for links to the various organizations. If you are a performer on a sound recording, sign up with MROC here.


How do I sign up?

Sign up is quick and easy on the SignUp page. You will be asked to complete an Appointment and Authorization form on which you provide personal information required for MROC to make payments to you. You will also need to supply information about your repertoire, i.e. the sound recordings on which you have performed.

If you prefer not to sign up online, contact us and we can provide you up with a paper Appointment and Authorization form.


Is there a registration fee?

There is no registration fee, but we do charge an administration fee on royalties we pay out. Currently, the administration fee is 15% on royalties collected in Canada but there is no fee on royalties we collect on your behalf from other territories.


Does MROC collect for the performance of my sound recordings in other countries?

Yes. Through agreements we’ve established with collectives in many other participating countries, MROC collects royalties for most of your performances abroad. We currently have agreements covering the following countries: Belgium, Brazil, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Spain, Sweden, USA, and the UK. Countries are added as new agreements are established.


How do I get paid?

When you register, you’ll be asked to supply MROC with information about the sound recordings you’ve performed on – your “repertoire”. Your repertoire is matched against usage information provided by radio stations and other businesses paying royalties. This usage information forms the basis of our distributions. If your sound recordings appear in the usage information and if they are eligible according to the criteria established in the Canadian Copyright Act, then MROC will be able to pay you for their use.


What are the eligibility criteria for neighbouring rights payments?

If your recordings appear in the usage information used for distribution, you may have royalties owing to you. For most neighbouring rights distributions, your sound recordings must meet the following criteria to be eligible for payment according to the requirements in the Canadian Copyright Act:

1) The sound recording was first recorded less than 50 years ago; and
2) i) The maker of the sound recording (i.e. the record label) was, at the date of recording, headquartered in Canada or a country that has signed either of two international copyright treaties – the Rome Convention or the WIPO Performances and Phonograms Treaty (WPPT) – as long as Canada’s Minister of Industry has not limited the right of that country in Canada.

OR

ii) The sound recording was entirely recorded in Canada, a Rome Convention country or a WPPT country, as long as Canada’s Minister of Industry has not limited the right of that country in Canada.

For most neighbouring rights distributions, the recordings of US makers are not eligible for payment unless they were recorded in Canada or in a country that has signed the Rome convention. Eligibility criteria is broader for sound recordings appearing in usage information from satellite radio, pay audio services, and webcasting. Recordings by US makers appearing in usage information from these sources in 2014 and later are eligible for payment in these distributions.


Who’s eligible for private copying royalties?

Eligibility for private copying royalties is dependent on the performer’s nationality rather than where the sound recording was made (as is the case for neighbouring rights). If you were a Canadian citizen or permanent resident of Canada when you played on a sound recording and your recording appears in the distribution data used for private copying – a combination of radio airplay and sales data – you are eligible to receive private copying payments.


When do I get paid?

MROC makes payments to artists throughout the year. For specifics on when you can expect your next payment, please contact us.


How much money can I expect?

There are many variables involved in the calculation of your royalties. The amount payable for a particular recording in a particular distribution is dependent on the number of times that recording appears in the distribution, whether the number of plays of a recording have been weighted for a distribution, how many eligible recordings appear in the data for a particular distribution, as well as other factors.

Your role on the recording – whether feature or non-feature – as well as the number of other performers on that recording also affect the amount you can expect to receive for a particular recording. Generally, under our current distribution rules, background musicians and vocalists share 20% of the total royalties allocated to the recording. The remaining 80% goes to the “featured” performers/artists. There are different divisions for classical recordings.


How do I inform you of new recordings?

If you have already registered with MROC, you can update your repertoire online. If you need help completing the repertoire submission forms, call MROC at: (office) 416-510-0279 or toll free at: 1- 855-510-0279. You can also email us at info@musiciansrights.ca.

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